Body language of a smile

Body language of a smile: It doesn’t matter where you go in the world there are a few things that are universal:

  • ·         Coca Cola
  • ·         Traffic
  • ·         Smiles

Now when it comes to other people you may not have the ability to speak their language but the universal sign and signal of approval is the smile. You know that whatever language you speak the smile is the gateway into others.

 

Body language of real smiles:

To learn about real smiles and how to understand them we will have to take a short trip to France. Its ok it will just take the time of this paragraph. You can thank a Dr. for Neurology as we know it today and that would be Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne (1806 – 1875).

 

Dr. Duchenne is the father of neurology as we know it. When you see a real or genuine smile you can have some inside knowledge and know that the Duchenne smile was named after him.

 

There are a few traits when understanding the nonverbal communication of a smile and also to know if it is a real smile that you are reading:

  • ·         The corners of the lips will pull back
  • ·         The eyes will create crows feet wrinkles

 

When you read or interpret a real smile you will see the corners of the lips pull back towards the ears. When a man or women gives a genuine smile you will see crow’s feet or wrinkles at the corners of the eye. As age sets in on both men and women these crow’s feet become more pronounced.

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Body language of a fake smile:

When you are reading into the nonverbal signs of a smile you will want to look at the corners of the lips and or the cheeks. The cheeks may raise in the case of a fake smile depending on the man or the woman .

 

In some instances a fake or generated smile may look more like surprise than a smile.

Most people cannot successfully fake a “genuine” smile and that is great news for you because you know when you interpret a genuine smile there is high probability it is real. One could guess it is a natural defense mechanism built over time to defend real emotions.

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Body language and learning how to read it:

Reading the signs of a real smile is a great place to learn how to read body language. A great place to look into and increase your capabilities is to look at photos or videos of men, women and kids smiling in order to get your baseline of this nonverbal communication skill. You can go places where people would have real smiles and get a feel for what they look like and you could also just observe people at dinner where on a weekend night you can see just about every human emotion and or micro expression possible.

 

It is important for you to know what your body language is doing so why not video tape yourself so you can see for yourself what you are doing when you communicate with others. See if you can give a real or Duchenne smile when you don’t want to and then you can also see what it looks like when you fake this experience.

 

Reading body language home study

You can find out more here in order to learn the signs and signals of nonverbal communication.

 

As always I would like to thank you in advance for your comments and or questions about reading the body language of a real smile.

 

 

Now go implement!

 

 

Scott Sylvan Bell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Body langauge expert Scott Sylvan Bell explains the body language of a real smile :video credit

Reading body langauge:Knowing your social value – part 2

Reading body language:
Learning how to read body language is a skill that compounds over time. Your
abilities to read nonverbal communication will become faster and more intense.
It may be that your skills for reading body language is not very advanced and
you may know the basics. When taking a look at pictures your skills may even
take longer in the beginning.

 

You may have learned about social value and what it means
when people see your non-verbal communication in real time.

 

There is a second part to learning about social value but
also living it. Self-control would be the missing aspect of social value.

 

Your ability to control yourself or the self-control factor is
always on display when in public or when transmitted on video and maybe past
the non-verbal area in audio form.

 

You are constantly being judged by those who are watching
you whether they are part of or associated with what you are doing.

 

You should be asking yourself:

  • Who is watching my actions?
  • What are others thinking?
  • Will there only be positive thoughts of my
    actions or can there be negative beliefs about what I am doing?
  • Can my actions be misconstrued?

 

These self-check questions are just guide lines to make sure
that you are being perceived as being seen as a positive light. Remember there
is always going to be a person who has to interpret what you are acting it.
This becomes even more important where you can lose value from others who are
watching.

 

Self control is a huge part of your non verbal or body language
communication and just for a second you are a salesperson and you do make
mistakes that would cause you to lose social value, do you think that you will
make the sale or transaction?

 

When was the last time that you were somewhere and there was
a person who was acting out of place? Was it uncomfortable? How did you feel
about the person? What thoughts did you assume about the person?

 

Every day when you are in public and you are communicating
your nonverbal communications are being judged as:

•           Positive
social value

•           Exempt
social value

•           No social
value or negative social value

 

One of the best ways to increase your body language skills
is to go to a bar or pub and watch people after they have a few to drink. The
people who have had a few drinks will let their guard down and not pay attention
to what they are doing like a person who is sober. Just remember if you decide
to drink you may be the person who is being judged if you do not control
yourself.

 

I would like to thank you in advance for your comments and
or questions.

 

Now go implement!

 

Scott Sylvan Bell

 

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